YouWorkForThem

  • LU LU
    A mono-weight, bifurcated serif typeface in all caps. Based off of an old classic French biscuit logo, this distinctive vintage display typeface can also evoke edgier sentiments when set in a moodier […]

Nanamee

Categories

abstract

YWFT Illuminati 1

It is with this incredible display font, Initiated in the Supreme Grade YWFT, that you shall preserve the Great Doctrine. Adding these heiroglyphic sigils, suitable for the Secret Languages of the Ages, to any manuscript shall Illuminate it. Let the Brother receive the Light! Download YWFT Illuminati, and save 43% off until November 30, 2013.

Read More
YWFT Pipe, the latest from YouWorkForThem

Starting out as a set of vectors, this series of tubes is now the Pipe you’ll want to share with your friends. This cylindrical monster has FIVE, count ‘em, FIVE tubular styles for users to layer: solid, shadow, outline, half-solid and texture (dots). Seriously, there’s so many design options at stake here, it’s as if […]

Read More

What happens when you explore type without the typographer’s eye in mind? What happens when you take type out of the centuries old, black and white, static world of type specimens? CDKVW is a YouWorkForThem short that takes five various fonts into the depths of the unknown and against various natural elements. Composed and filmed […]

Read More
Cumulus and Foam - Teaser

Some of you may recall a little font release by the name of Black Slabbath that we launched back in 2008. Well, the designer of that fantastic font release is back at it again. Stefan Kjartansson is this designer in mention and his latest font creation is anything but normal. We have to say, this […]

Read More
Guilloche & Moire

Our newest lineup of 2009 stock vectors, images and videos; Guilloche & Moire. Guilloche is an engraving technique in which a very precise intricate repetitive patterns or design is mechanically etched into an underlying material with very fine detail. Specifically, it involves a technique of engine turning, called guilloché in French after the French engineer “Guillot”, who invented a machine “that could scratch fine patterns and designs on metallic surfaces”. The machine improved upon the more time-consuming practice of making similar designs by hand, allowing for greater delicacy, precision, and closeness of the line, as well as greater speed.

Read More